Fitness

The Paper Plate Workout

Before I go global with this new exercise craze, I wanted to share it with you first. Inspired by some moves I learned in Beachbody’s 80 Day Obsession workout, I have prepared a 20 minute full body workout you can do in your living room. The only equipment you need is a pair of paper plates. That’s right. Don’t laugh. Moves like Windshield Wipers, Pike Scissor Twist, and Sumo Slide will challenge any fitness level.

Join me in Studio 1A at Team Quadzilla World Headquarters for a workout unlike any you’ve done before.

Get the full workout HERE.

Team Quadzilla Paper Plate Workout_Medium_Moment

You can also find other excellent workouts you can do at home with minimal equipment for FREE in the Fitness Challenges page on my website.

Fitness

10 Reasons Why You Hate Working Out

Why You Don’t Like Working Out, And How to Improve Exercise Motivation

Why you hate it: It’s boring.

Solution: For some people, there’s nothing worse than running. Others hate swimming. And still others would rather get a root canal than lift weights at the gym. That’s why it’s important to try a variety of exercise styles to find what most appeals to you. There are tons of different types of workouts that appeal to all types of people. My guess is that if you think exercise is boring, you just haven’t found something you like. Try something new.

I can help you find interesting ways to get moving, or you can head to Beachbody On Demand for a selection of more than 40 different workout programs for all fitness levels and cover everything from weightlifting to yoga. Check out this guide to get an overview of the most popular options.

Why you hate it: It’s not fun to workout alone.

Solution: A good workout buddy can boost your enjoyment, and studies show that it can even encourage you to exercise more often. When it comes to working out, being accountable to another person can also go a long way towards keeping you on track with your schedule.

Working out in a group can multiply the benefits — especially when it comes to exercise enjoyment. Some have found great success with a group at the gym or in virtual/ online groups.  Conversely, working out alone CAN be fun and very rewarding if you have a personally compelling reason WHY you are working out. When your mission is greater than your fears & excuses, you will mysteriously find joy in the process – even when you are doing it alone.

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Why you hate it: It’s exhausting.

Solution: When you get home from a long day at work, all you want to do is plant your butt on the couch; trying to summon enough energy to exercise is the last thing on your mind. But research shows that physical activity can increase energy levels rather than sap them. Working out could be just what you need to have a productive end to your day.

But if you just can’t pick yourself up in the evening, pick a time of day to work out when you’re typically more energized, and when you can work out consistently. That last part is key. As the saying goes “the best time to work out is the time when you will work out.”

Why you hate it: You’re afraid you’re going to fail.

Solution: Sometimes it feels easier to avoid a task altogether than to risk falling short of your goal. If you never start trying to lose weight, then you can’t fail at it, right?

This is why Baby Steps are key: They help you work towards something you can actually achieve. “It’s important to set small, reasonable goals for yourself,” Dr. Leo Marvin says. Acknowledging your success can be a huge step forward in making the workout plan more enjoyable. When you hit a goal, celebrate it and set the next baby step.

Truthfully, the only way to fail on your healthy living journey is to never start, or to give up. This is a journey – filled with ups and downs, progress and setbacks. Embrace the journey and press on. Your future self will thank you for conquering your fear.

Why you hate it: You don’t like getting sweaty.

Solution: Unfortunately, in order to lose weight or gain strength, you’ll need to put in some hard work and get sweaty at some point. To avoid having to repeat your ‘get ready for work routine’, time your intense workouts to the beginning or end of your day.

Fortunately, you don’t have to subscribe to a gut-busting, sweat-soaked workout every single day. There are low-impact and low-intensity exercises that can give you a decent calorie burn without sweating buckets. Try activities like yoga or walking. Research suggests that you can gain major health benefits from a simple 30-minute walking routine. It’s enough to get your heart rate up, but won’t leave you soaked and smelly.

Why you hate it: It takes up too much time.

Solution: Whether you have a demanding job, no childcare, or both, it can be a challenge to find time to exercise. This is the most common excuse I hear for why people don’t exercise. To get over this hurdle, start small, and make exercise a non-negotiable must-do. Schedule it like you would a recurring business meeting. Start treating exercise like a key part of your day instead of a perpetual afterthought.

Break up your workout into short intervals throughout the day if you aren’t able to find a time to get everything done at once. I shared some excellent body weight workouts you can do anywhere anytime that really work. Try “habit stacking.” Simply add a few minutes of exercise on top of something else you already do every day, like doing some push-ups after you brush your teeth. You don’t have to work out for very long to notice a benefit (research shows that even a few minutes of intense exercise per week can improve cardiovascular fitness), but you do have to be consistent.

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Why you hate it: You can’t afford or don’t want to pay for a gym membership

Solution: Access to workout facilities and equipment can play a major role in sticking with a workout routine. So why add extra obstacles like a gym membership or tons of gear into the mix when they’re not necessary? Angie and I exercise in our living room with minimal equipment. Though we have different expressions after our workouts, it sure beats going to the gym! With Beachbody On Demand‘s extensive exercise library, which includes more than 600 fat-blasting workouts that can be done in a six foot-by-six foot area — we never get bored, and don’t have to leave home. Not only does working out at home save you the money of a gym membership, but it also lets you exercise on your own time.

Why you hate it: It’s embarrassing to work out in front of other people.

Solution: Exercise is supposed to relieve stress, not contribute to it. If you make yourself work out in an environment where you feel judged, it’s likely you won’t stick with it. This is a big reason why at-home workouts are so appealing. Being able to exercise in the privacy of your own living room removes the fear of being judged by others. It also allows you to slow down and learn new exercises at your own pace, instead of feeling pressured to do it right the first time.

Why you hate it: You’re really out of shape.

Solution: The first few days or weeks of a new exercise program are often the hardest. Even when you do muster the energy to work out, new moves often leave you feeling tired and sore in places you didn’t even know existed. To avoid this, take steps to prevent muscle soreness so you don’t get discouraged. Start slowly, and gradually increase your effort and intensity based on how you feel after each successive workout.

What you eat after working out can also optimize your recovery and help prevent soreness. Beachbody Performance Recover is made with 20 grams of protein to aid muscle repair and growth, and it contains pomegranate extract, which has been shown to reduce muscle soreness.

Additionally, listen to your body and schedule rest and recovery days when needed. Getting enough sleep, stretching, and eating well is extremely important. Try not to work the same muscle groups really hard on consecutive days.

Why you hate it: It’s all just too overwhelming.

Solution: The sheer volume of fitness advice in the world can be intimidating. That’s why it’s vital to not overcomplicate the process of getting started. Keep it simple: Think about what sounds like fun and really go for it. Just DO something. Yoda says, “Do or don’t do, there is no try.” Exercising is still work. Results take time and effort, so don’t give up when it gets difficult. Make the commitment to yourself to get on the healthy living train and stay there. One baby step at a time. Be stronger than your excuses. You can do this!

Special thanks to Mackenzie Lobby Havey and the Team Beachbody blog for doing the heavy lifting on this article!

Fitness

Take Care of Your Hips – 9 Best Hip Stretches

If you are a Desk Jockey like me, this article is for you. Consider all the time you spend sitting at a desk or in your La-Z-Boy. For many of us, there are WAY too many of our waking hours spent drafting spreadsheets, attending meetings, posting on social media, watching Seinfeld re-runs, etc. That’s a lot of time for your hip joints to be stuck in a single position.

That’s a problem. “Elongated periods of sitting sends messages to certain muscles to stay turned on which keeps other muscles turned off,” says Beachbody fitness expert Cody Braun. “This creates an imbalance, which can immobilize your hips.” Your hips are built to move in almost any direction, explains Braun, and when they’re stiff, they don’t just make exercise more difficult; they also make you more prone to pain in surrounding joints — including the oft-troublesome lower back.

If your hip joints could use some TLC, help has arrived. All you need to do is spend a moment or two before and after your workouts or, heck, while watching TV — on a time-honored fitness activity that few of us do enough of: stretching. Below, I’ll show you some of the best hip stretches to improve flexibility and mobility, hopefully making up for all that time on your bum.

Why Hip Mobility Is Important

Quick physiology lesson: when a joint becomes stiff and immobile, the joint above and below it moves to compensate. So if you can’t move your hips, you’ll move your lower back instead.

Know anyone with lower back pain?

Oh, that’s right the overwhelming majority of Americans has lower back pain. If that includes you, you may benefit from making some or all of the hip stretches below part of your regular routine.

But mobile hip joints don’t just relieve pain. They’re also essential for walking, hiking, running, jumping, dancing, playing sports, and pursuing virtually any fitness goal safely and effectively. Want to develop stronger, more muscular legs? Hip mobility allows you to lunge and squat more deeply so you can reach your muscles’ potential. Want to avoid injury? Hip mobility improves range of motion so you can perform exercises more safely.

Anatomy of the Hips

The pelvis, that sturdy, bony structure that houses your hip joints, is the Grand Central Station of the body: dozens of different muscles, nerves, and tendons attach to and pass through it. The main ones you’ll focus on in your hip stretches are:

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Hip flexors

These muscles extend roughly from your spine to your thighs. Their main job is to pull your thighs toward your chest. When they’re tight, they can pull the front of your pelvis downward, causing strain and pain in your lower back.

Hamstrings

This muscle group, including the biceps femoris muscle, runs along the backs of your thighs from your hips to your knees. Your hams oppose your quadriceps, bending your knee and helping to extend (straighten) your hip joints behind you.

Adductors

Located on the insides of your thighs, these muscles squeeze your legs together, and can cause tightness and limitation when you step laterally (sideways).

Glutes

The butt muscles work along with the hamstrings to extend, or straighten, your hips, and, with the aid of the abductors on the outsides of your hips, raise your legs out to the sides.

Stretch these four main areas to help increase mobility, and you’ll be good to go.

2 Main Types of Stretching and When to Use Them

The 9 hip stretches below, all culled from the extensive library of full-body workout programs available at Beachbody on Demand, offer two different stretching techniques: dynamic and static stretches, which you should use at different times.

Dynamic stretching

These are large, full-range movements of one or more joints at once, often performed standing and sometimes while walking or jogging. They resemble old-school movements you might have done in calisthenics or gym class: arm swings, leg swings, high-knee walks. You usually count off reps, rather than time, on dynamic stretches, which work best as a warm-up activity before a workout, or any time you need a pick-me-up boost throughout the day.

Static stretching

These movements are slower and mellower; they’re the reach-and-hold stretches you might see in a basic yoga or stretching class. Forward bends, knees-wide butterfly stretches, the pigeon, or the figure 4 pose in yoga are classic examples.

Often you’ll perform static stretches seated or lying down, and focus on breathing slowly and deeply to facilitate relaxation sometimes for several minutes at a time. Static stretches can be very effective at loosening you up, but they also inhibit performance in the stretched muscles for a short time afterwards. So they’re best reserved for after a workout, or as an any-time stress reliever just not right before a workout involving the muscles you’re stretching.

9 of the Best Pre- and Post-Workout Hip Stretches

Together with a healthy diet and a great workout program, the following hip stretches will leave you feeling and looking your best.

Seated Leg Cradle

leg cradle

Type of Stretch: Static

Benefits: Lengthens and relieves tension in the glutes, adductors, and hamstrings.

Appears in: Yoga Studio – Hip Opening With Faith

• Sit on the floor with both legs extended straight in front of you, feet flexed.

• Keeping your back straight, draw your right knee toward your chest, and try one or more of the following variations:

  1. Holding your right knee in your right hand, grab your right ankle with your left hand and draw it toward your chest as far as you can.
  2. Draw your right ankle toward your chest and rest your lower leg inside the creases of your elbows, bending them to draw your leg as close as you can to your chest.
  3. Draw your right ankle toward your chest and wrap your arms around the lower leg, interlacing your fingers with your knee inside the crease of your right elbow and your foot inside the crook of your left. Hug your lower leg toward your chest as far as you can.

• Keeping your back flat, your chest up, and both feet flexed, rock slightly left and right.

• Hold for 30 seconds, then repeat on the other side.

Standing Butterfly Lift

standing butterfly

Type of stretch: Dynamic

Benefits: Activates the glutes while improving mobility in the hip capsule (the ligament that attaches the leg to the pelvis) and adductors.

Appears in: Yoga Studio – Get Well Rounded With Elise

• Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart about 18 inches behind two yoga blocks positioned on the floor at the tallest height.

• Hinge forward at your hips and place your hands on the blocks. (If that’s too difficult, use a taller surface like a chair instead.)

• Bend your right knee, pulling your heel towards your right glute, and keep it there throughout the set. This is your starting position.

• Keeping your back flat and standing leg straight, lift your right knee as far out to your right side as you can.

• Reverse the move, lowering your right knee until it’s close to your left.

• Repeat for 10-12 controlled repetitions, then repeat on your other side.

Frog Alternate Legs

frog leg

Type of stretch: Dynamic

Benefits: Stretches the adductors and improves mobility in the hip capsule.

Appears in: Shift Shop  Shift Mobility

 Lie face down, bend your knees about 90 degrees, and spread them as wide as you can. Fold your hands under your forehead to relax your upper body.

• Keeping your knees bent, slowly roll your right thigh inward, lowering your right foot toward the floor.

• Try to tap your right foot on the floor, and reverse the move, repeating on your other side.

• Continue slowly alternating sides for 30 seconds.

Butterfly

butterfly

Type of stretch: Static

Benefits: Lengthens the adductors and reduces tension along the entire spine and back of the neck.

Appears in: 21 Day Fix  Yoga

• Sit on the floor upright with your legs bent, the soles of your feet together, and your knees spread wide.

• Keeping your knees spread as wide as possible, take hold of your feet and slowly pull your forehead towards the floor.

• Hold this stretched position for 30-60 seconds.

Scorpion

scorpion

Type of stretch: Dynamic

Benefits: Stretches the quads and hip flexors, and activates the glutes.

Appears in: P90X3  Dynamix

• Lie on your stomach, with your legs straight, and arms extended out to the sides, forming a “T.” Your palms should face down.

• Keeping your left leg straight, lift your right leg off the floor, bend your right knee, and cross your right foot behind your left, continuing up toward your left hand.

• Try to tap your left hand with your right foot, and return to the starting position.

• Continue for 30 seconds, and repeat on your other side.

Runners Lunge

runners lunge

Type of stretch: Static or dynamic, depending on how long you hold the position.

Benefits: Stretches the adductors and glutes.

Appears in: 21 Day Fix Extreme  Yoga Fix Extreme

• Assume a pushup position: hands and balls of your feet on the floor, both shoulder-width apart, and your body straight from head to heels.

• Step your right foot to a point just outside your right hand. (Your right knee should be near your right shoulder.) If possible, lower your elbows to the floor.

• Hold for 15 seconds, and reverse the move to return to the starting position

• Repeat the entire sequence on your other side.

Sumo Reach

sumo reach

Type of stretch: Dynamic/static

Benefits: Strengthens the glutes and shoulders, stretches the adductors, opens the hip joints, and rib cage.

Appears in: Insanity  Max Recovery

• Assume a wide stance, turning both feet out about 45 degrees.

• Keeping your torso upright, and your core engaged, bend your knees and lower your trunk as you extend both arms straight out to the sides, palms down, forming a “T.”

• Perform three pulses downward, sinking more deeply into this wide-stance (“sumo”) squat each time.

• Keeping your back long and your arms straight, bend your torso to the left as far as you can, and try to place your left palm on the floor near the inside of your left foot.

• Look up at your right palm and hold the position for a 5- to 10-count.

• Brace your core to return to the starting position, and perform the entire sequence on your other side.

Groiner

groiner

Type of stretch: Dynamic

Benefits: Stretches the glutes, adductors, and hip flexors.

Appears in: P90X3  Dynamix

• Assume a pushup position: hands and balls of your feet on the floor, both shoulder-width apart, and your body straight from head to heels.

• Step your right foot to a point just outside your right hand.

• Sink into the move for a one-count, lowering your hips as far as possible.

• Return your foot to the starting position.

• Continue for 30 seconds, then repeat on the other side.

Too tough? Perform the move with your hands elevated on yoga blocks.

World’s Greatest Stretch

worlds greatest

Type of stretch: Static

Benefits: Lengthens the hip flexors, adductors, chest, and rib cage.

Appears in: Clean Week: Mobility

• Start in a deep lunge with your right foot forward, your left knee and top of your left foot on the floor behind you, and your palms about hip distance apart on the floor inside your right foot.

• Keeping your back flat and both arms straight, lift your right hand up toward the ceiling as high as you can, twisting your torso into your right knee.

• Hold for 10 seconds, then return your right hand to the floor.

• Maintaining the same position in your lower body, lift your left arm up towards the ceiling in the same manner.

• Hold for 10 seconds, then slowly return your left hand to the floor.

• Switch sides, and repeat the sequence.

Thanks to Andy Heffernan and the Beachbody Blog for doing the heavy lifting on this article.

Fitness

12 Tips to Help You Stick With Exercise

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Exercise by definition is work. And it’s hard to put in the work to get results. It’s easy to talk yourself out of exercising. Even when you have the best intentions to work out, excuses are so easy to find — “I’m too tired,” or “I’m busy,” or “The weather is bad.”

The right attitude and a few tricks can keep your fitness routine on track. Use these tips to stay in the game:

1. Do it for yourself. Studies show that people who are “externally motivated” — that is, they hit the gym just to look good at the class reunion — don’t stick with it. Those who are “internally motivated” — meaning they exercise because they love it — are the ones who stay in it for the long run. Check out this video from the Quadzilla YouTube archive to help “find your WHY” to make exercise part of your lifestyle.

2. Take baby steps. You would never try to run 10 miles on day one, right? When you do too much too soon, you’ll end up sore, injured, and discouraged. Take it easy as you get started. Maybe you only run a quarter mile your first week. When that becomes easy, you can make it more challenging. Having a plan to follow will expedite your progress without killing yourself. Baby Steps really works!

3. Hang tough. No one has perfect form the first day of strength training. Every workout takes practice. You’ll get the hang of it if you keep making an effort. And if you use the best home workout videos in the universe, there is always a modifier to help you ease into the moves.

4. Mix it up. Do different types of workouts to keep things interesting and to exercise different muscle groups. I can testify that running 5k’s works your legs and lungs differently than when playing basketball. Mix up your cardio to optimize your fitness gains. Also, switch up your weight lifting routine with some killer body weight exercises. You don’t have to reinvent your entire routine every week, but you do want to shift it around a little.

5. Don’t be your own drill sergeant. Half of all people who start a new exercise program ditch it within the first year. It often happens because they can’t keep up the boot-camp pace they’ve forced on themselves. It’s better to work within your limits, and gradually get stronger.

6. Bring a friend. When your inner demons order you to hit the couch instead of the treadmill, a workout partner can steer you back in the right direction. It’s easier to bail out on the gym than on the friend who waits for you there. Studies show you’ll also work out longer when you have a pal along. I like to exercise with my wife and son. We hold each other accountable and it’s something fun to do together.

7. Show the clock who’s boss. Health experts say you should aim for at least 150 minutes of exercise a week (30 minutes a day, five times a week, for example), plus weight training at least twice a week. Can’t find room in your crazy schedule? Take a closer look. If you work too late to get to a gym, keep a set of weights at home. If you can’t do 30 minutes at once, break exercise sessions up into 10- or 15-minute bursts. Trust me on this, you have more time than you think. If exercise is important to you, you will make time for it.

8. Get used to it. Your workout should be just as much a habit as brushing your teeth or eating breakfast. When it’s part of your routine, you won’t even have to think about it. In a few months, fitness can be a regular feature in your day.

9. Live in the present. So what if you missed a week of workouts and polished off a pint of ice cream over the weekend? Leave the guilt in the past. You have a chance to get back into your routine today.

10. Keep it real. You’re not going to skim off 30 pounds in a week. Aim for something that’s realistic as a first step. For instance, increase your workout schedule from 2 to 3 days a week, or exercise for 15 more minutes each time. Baby steps.

11. Track it. Keep a fitness journal or use an app to record your progress — for example, how much you run, walk, or lift and the calories you burn. Progress photos are a great way to measure your progress and remind you where you came from. A good training plan/ calendar will help with this too. Ask me about a plan to suit your needs!

12. Celebrate! It takes weeks to see real changes. Reward yourself with new gear or a sensible treat when you reach progress milestones. Share your results with others, so they can celebrate with you and encourage you to keep up the good work.

SOURCES:Acevedo E. Psychobiology of Physical Activity, Human Kinetics, 2006.CDC: “How much physical activity do adults need?”Ryan, R. International Journal of Sport Psychology, 1997.Matsumoto, H. International Journal of Sport and Health Science, 2004.Dunton, G. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, September 2009.U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Fitness, Nutrition

7 Healthy Habits for LASTING Weight Loss

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There’s a group of people out there who know the keys to losing weight and keeping it off. Lasting weight loss is about figuring out what works well in your life and making it into a habit. So who better to learn from than highly successful people who have lost 30 pounds or more and kept the weight off for at least a year?

Who Are These People?

The folks we’re talking about are real people who did real work to shed pounds — and now they’re willing participants in an ongoing research study that started in 1994. They lost the weight, kept it off for a year (or more), and then signed up for the National Weight Control Registry (NCWR), which aims to be the largest study of long-term, successful weight-loss maintenance.

The NCWR has registered 10,000 individuals since it began, and the average person in the registry has kept off 66 pounds for 5.5 years and counting. About half of them report having at least one overweight parent. Most are between the ages of 44 and 49, which could mean that it takes time to figure out just the right mix of diet and exercise habits.

What’s in it for participants? They get to help scientists figure out how they could escape the cycle of yo-yo dieting with which so many people struggle. While each person’s weight-loss journey is unique, there were seven common habits that worked for these weight-loss winners. Here’s where we think they got it right:

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1. They eat fewer calories than the average American

Most of the registry participants ate a low-calorie diet the average was 1,306 calories for women and 1,685 calories for men. For perspective, American women and men in their 40’s eat an average of about 1,873 and 2,520 calories, respectively.

The science behind eating fewer calories to lose weight is solid, but over the years, we’ve learned that a calorie is not a calorie. The quality of those calories matters significantly. That’s why 100 calories of fiber-filled apple slices can help you feel fuller longer than 100 calories of licorice.

Counting calories is helpful, but turning it into a habit can be a challenge. Calories do count, but you don’t always need to count them. You can achieve similar results (with less math) by learning how to control portion sizes. Something as simple as portion containers can help you learn what is the right amount of food (read: calories) for your body. And don’t forget about calorie quality: Aim for a balanced nutrition plan that includes plenty of fruits, veggies, whole-grains, lean proteins, and healthy fat.

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2. They eat often, up to five times a day

The registry participants eat more frequently than people who are overweight. They generally eat five times daily, which breaks out to three meals and two snacks. Science has a tough time making the final call on whether or not eating more often will hurt or help your progress.

Sure, eating often can mean more opportunities to overeat, but it’s also a good strategy to deal with hunger. Grazing on healthy snacks like fresh fruits, veggies, string cheese, and Greek yogurt is a no-brainer. Just remember that there’s a fine line between a snack and a full-blown meal.

3. They stick to a consistent diet

Most registry participants eat a fairly consistent diet whether it’s a weekday, weekend, holiday, or vacation. Results show that those who ate a consistent diet the entire week were 1.5 times more likely to maintain their weight within five pounds over the course of one year compared with those who ate a healthy diet strictly on weekdays.

While there’s not a ton of research in this area, this habit makes sense. Eating the same foods every day can help with self-control and keep unplanned temptations to a minimum. Keep in mind it’s perfectly OK to indulge in a cheat meal once in a while, but keep it to that: once in a while.

4. They don’t skip breakfast

A whopping 78% of those in the registry report eating breakfast every day, which is consistent with the trend that people who eat a morning meal usually weigh less.

Bear in mind that skipping breakfast won’t entirely make or break your weight-loss efforts. In fact, a small number of folks will skip this meal to lose weight through intermittent fasting. Fasting isn’t for everyone, so if that’s not your cup of tea, keep calm, and join the breakfast club.

A breakfast with a balance of protein, fat, and carbohydrates (high in fiber) like two eggs scrambled with vegetables and maybe 1/4 of an avocado, 1/2 cup of oatmeal, and one cup of fruit — can set the tone for the rest of day. I personally LOVE drinking Vegan Chocolate Shakeology blended with a banana, ice, and unsweetened almond milk. It keeps me full and energized all morning. And chocolate for breakfast…yes please!

A good breakfast may help cut down mid-morning hunger and decrease the chances you’ll be “hangry” by lunch. All this can build up to better food choices throughout the day, so you’ll be able to breeze by your co-worker’s batch of brownies.

7-Healthy-Habits-of-People-Who-Lost-30-Pounds.iStock.inpost

5. They prioritize daily exercise

Almost all (90 percent) registry participants exercise for about one hour every day. This habit is especially effective because nutrition works hand in hand with exercise to promote weight loss. Additionally, working out can help build more defined muscles.

The most effective ways to change your body composition is to add strength training and/or high-intensity interval training (HIIT) to your workout routine. Besides helping you slip into that little black dress, surprising exercise benefits include improvements in sleep, mood, and productivity.

6. They weigh in weekly

The scale can feel like a constant reminder that your goal weight is far away. People dread weighing in mostly because they don’t like the number they see. Yet, 75% of successful weight-loss maintainers weigh themselves at least once each week.

That number on the scale can be the motivation to implement healthy habits and stay focused on your goals. Hitting an “all-time high in weight” is a common trigger for someone to want to lose weight. Monitoring your weight weekly can catch a one- to two-pound weight gain, as opposed to monthly, where you could gain a much more significant amount.

While it’s a good idea to weigh in regularly, guilt-tripping yourself each time you step on a scale is a big no-no. Instead, think of that number as a valuable data point that can help you troubleshoot and plan for the coming weeks. Also focus on non-scale victories like how your clothes fit, how you feel with energy and confidence, and choosing well when tempted with treats that aren’t part of your plan.

7. They don’t binge-watch TV

If you’re juggling work, friends, and family, you know time is precious and finding time for healthy habits can be a challenge. But unless you’re doing burpees while binge-watching HGTV, you’re not making much progress when you’re in front of the TV. And to add insult to injury, eating while watching TV can contribute to weight gain through mindless eating. This doesn’t mean you have to give up television to see success, but you should limit your screen time to about 10 hours a week. By limiting screen time, you can make more time for other activities (hint: exercise).

The Bottom Line

It would be nice to think that these people are privy to some super-secret way to lose a lot of weight and keep it off. But the simple truth is that there is no secret; it takes hard work, consistency, and patience to see results that last. There is no magic pill, patch, wrap, or chemical concoction that will get you long term, sustainable and healthy results. Eat right. Sweat often. Rest. Repeat. You can do this!

Many thanks goes to Trinh Le, R.D. and the Teambeachbodyblog for doing the heavy lifting on this article.